Conservation Commission

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The Jericho Conservation Commission (JCC) advises the SelectBoard and other town commissions on best practices for management of natural resources on Town Land. The JCC is also available for residential consultation on request. The Conservation Commission is committed to public education and strives to help Jericho residents learn more about the natural communities within our town and beyond. The JCC has membership in the Vermont Association of Conservation Commissions.








The Conservation
Commission meets the 3rd Wednesday of every month.






The Jericho Town Tree

American Elm (Ulmus americana) on Rt. 15


The Conservation Commission has 3 vacancies


The Jericho Conservation Commission (JCC) advises the SelectBoard and other town commissions on best practices for management of natural resources on Town Land. The JCC is also available for residential consultation on request. The Conservation Commission is committed to public education and strives to help Jericho residents learn more about the natural communities within our town and beyond. The JCC has membership in the Vermont Association of Conservation Commissions.








The Conservation
Commission meets the 3rd Wednesday of every month.






The Jericho Town Tree

American Elm (Ulmus americana) on Rt. 15


The Conservation Commission has 3 vacancies

  • Pollinator Gardens 101

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    Join the Jericho Conservation Commission on Thursday, May 19 at 6:30 pm at the Community Center (Browns Trace) as we welcome local plant expert and nursery owner, Jane Sorenson.

    She will give us professional tips on how we can use pollinator plants to improve the ecological function of our gardens. Learn which plants can be used to provide blooms throughout the growing season to support a wide range of native bees and other pollinators.

    Jane Sorenson is a retired landscape architect. She gives presentations on Landscape Design for Pollinators around the region and also teaches a course at the University of Vermont. Her locally grown plants were featured in our recent pollinator plant sale to benefit the Community Center.

  • All About Bats presentation

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    Friday the 13th Bat Walk and Talk

    Learn Why It’s GOOD LUCK To Have Bats Around

    8pm, May 13th – meet at the Jericho Center Green

    Join state small mammals biologist Alyssa Bennett from the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department as she teaches us about the bats in your backyard, barn, and bat house.

    Take a walk around the Green and nearby quiet streets as the sun goes down and bat activity starts up around dusk to learn about what bats live in Jericho and how you can manage your home, yard, fields, and forests to support these voracious insect eaters while avoiding any unwanted conflicts.

    Providing there is good weather (no heavy rain, strong winds, or temperatures below 45 degrees), we will also be able to listen for bat activity and identify species flying in the air around us using specialized microphones and sonogram software. Dress for a walk on easy terrain and bring a headlamp for this family-friendly event.

  • The Great Backyard Bird Count 2022

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    The Great Backyard Bird count is a Community Science event open to anyone who wants to participate. Join bird watchers from around the globe between February 18 and 21 to be part of this event. How To Participate

  • A Word on Worms...

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    Most earthworms present in the northeast are considered exotic. They were introduced in the 18th & 19th centuries via early settlers or through trade of soil and horticultural materials transported from Europe and Asia. New ones are continuing to be introduced spreading through fishing bait, compost and gardening supplies and plant exchanges.

    Click to read more about invasive worms

    Watch a short video on invasive worms

  • The State of New England's Native Plants

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    From the Native Plant Trust:

    For the first time in 200 years, every state in New England is losing forest, and the conservation community has issued the call for increased land and habitat protection.

    But what’s on the land we seek to protect? Our forests bear little resemblance to those the pilgrims encountered. The mix of trees and understory plants has changed due to the enduring legacy of settlers’ clearcutting and farming, which altered soils and microclimates; to a history of management favoring useful or commercial species; and, more recently, to diseases and pests. The understory vegetation is comparatively species-poor, and non-native plants have a strong foothold. The tale is similar for other habitats in the region, which face a constellation of threats and are losing the plant diversity that makes nature resilient.

    Saving acreage from development is an important first step, but conserving native plants on those parcels and private land is critical for sustaining healthy, biologically diverse landscapes. Native plants are the backbone of habitat, for us and for insects, birds, mammals, and other organisms. Plants supply the oxygen we breathe, regulate the climate, and clean the water. They are the base of the food chain that leads to our own dinner table, and the loss of a single plant species can disrupt an intricate web supporting myriad plants and animals.

    When native plants are imperiled, the entire ecosystem is at risk ..... click here for full report

  • Vermont Land Ethic - Winter 2021Book List

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    Members of Land Ethic Vermont have teamed up to share some of our favorite books about the natural world, conservation, and science. This winter edition has been put together by partners from the Vermont Land Trust, Vermont Woodlands Association, Audubon Vermont, Vermont Coverts, the Vermont Department of Fish & Wildlife, and the Vermont Department of Forests, Parks and Recreation. Click here for a list of recommended books: Winter 2021 Reading List

    Click link for more information about the Vermont Land Ethic group: https://storymaps.arcgis.com/stories/6113bb1516a04f79bda868e82c43f0e4

  • Two Misconceptions About Forests

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    In his recent article "Two Misconceptions About Forests" Chittenden County Forester, Ethan Tapper, writes: Good forest management is more than just cutting valuable trees: it seeks to be regenerative, to improve conditions for wildlife, to make forests more resilient in a changing climate, to protect biodiversity, to benefit our communities and future generations. Read more....


    Photo: Leaving snags, or standing dead trees, is an important practice for healthy forest management and provides important habitat for wildlife.

  • Pollinators Play an Important Role in our Forests

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    Here is a recent article from Chittenden County Forester, Ethan Tapper, on the topic of managing our forests for pollinators.



    Managing Forests for Pollinators - Ethan Tapper


  • Mobbs Bioblitz - Spring Edition

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    CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.
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    The Jericho Conservation Commission is partnering with the Mobbs Committee to host a spring Bioblitz from May 8-23. 2021.

    Why a Bioblitz? A bioblitz is a community science effort to record as many species within a designated location and time period as possible, in this case, our own backyard treasure - Mobbs Farm.

    Anyone can participate, but you will need to set up an account on iNaturalist to submit your observations. Visit the JCC/Mobbs Bioblitz page to sign up. Our goal is to learn more about the diversity of natural communities that exist within the Mobbs boundaries by inviting residents to make observations of plants, insects, birds, fungi (photographs or sound recordings) during their walks along the trails and submit them to iNaturalist . This project will allow us to continue safe distancing while exploring nature within Jericho. Participants should NOT collect items... follow the "Take only photographs, leave only footprints" mantra. You can make observations any time within the specified dates (May 8-23, 2021) as long as you are anywhere on the Mobbs property.

    All participants must follow the parking guidelines and rules of Mobbs while participating in the Bioblitz.

    State of Vermont COVID-19 restrictions in place during the dates should be followed.

    The Mobbs Farm Property, acquired by the Town of Jericho in 1970, is located approximately one mile south of Jericho Center on Browns Trace. The property consists of over 260 acres of both open and forested land and is roughly separated into two equal halves by Fitzsimonds Road.


  • Emerald Ash Borer Awareness

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    Emerald Ash Borer in Vermont

    Emerald ash borer (EAB), an invasive forest pest, has been confirmed in Vermont.

    As of October 2020 Jericho is in the Confirmed Infested Area.

    EAB is a major threat to our trees and forests. The emerald ash borer has feasted on over 100 million ash trees in the Midwest, where it was first discovered in 2002. Unless treated with insecticides, most infested trees die within 3 to 5 years. Experience in Michigan and other states has shown that once this pest is detected in an area, more detections follow quickly — and the ash trees die rapidly over a few short years. EAB was confirmed in Vermont and 2018 and there are currently confirmed infestations in five Vermont counties.

    Photo Credit: Debbie Miller, US Forest Service, Bugwood.org

Page last updated: 19 May 2022, 09:38 AM